Lactobacillus kimchii
Taxonomy
Morphology
Cultural characteristics
Biochemical characters
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References
Phylum Firmicutes, Class Bacilli, Order Lactobacillales, Family Lactobacillaceae, Genus Lactobacillus, [Group B lactobacilli
(facultatively heterofermentative), unique phylogenetic-group],
Lactobacillus kimchi  Yoon, Kang, Mheen, Ahn, Lee, Kim, Park, Kho,
Kang and Park 2000.
Synonym: according to Pang et al. (2012)
Lactobacillus kimchii  Yoon et al. 2000 is a later heterotypic synonym of Lactobacillus
paralimentarius
Cai et al. 1999.
Gram-positive, short and slander rods, 0.6-0.8 x 1.5-3.0 µm, occurring singly, in pairs,
or occasionally in short chains. Nonmotile. Nonspore-forming.
After 3 days incubation on MRS agar, colonies are white, circular to slightly irregular,
convex, smooth, opaque, and approximately 0.8-1.5 mm in diameter. Facultatively
anaerobic. Can grow at 10 and 40 ºC, but not at 45 ºC. Optimum growth temperature
is 30 ºC. Can grow at pH 9.0, but not at pH 4.0; optimum pH is 6.0-7.0. Can grow in
8% NaCl, not in 10% NaCl.
Isolated from kimchi, a Korean fermented vegetable food. Produce a bacteriocin.
Undetermined.
  1. Hammes W.P. and Hertel C., 2009. Genus I. Lactobacillus Beijerinck 1901. In: (Eds.) P.D. Vos, G. Garrity, D. Jones, N.R. Krieg, W.
    Ludwig, F.A. Rainey, K.-H. Schleifer, W.B. Whitman. Bergey’s Manual of Systematic Bacteriology, Volume 3: The Firmicutes,
    Springer, 465-511.
  2. Yoon J.H., Kang S.S., Mheen T.I., Ahn J.S., Lee H.J., Kim T.K., Park C.S., Kho Y.H., Kang K.H. and Park Y.H., 2000. Lactobacillus
    kimchii sp. nov., a new species from kimchi. IJSEM 50, 1789-1795.
  3. Pang H, Kitahara M, Tan Z, Wang Y, Qin G, Ohkuma M, Cai Y. Reclassification of Lactobacillus kimchii and Lactobacillus bobalius
    as later subjective synonyms of Lactobacillus paralimentarius. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol 2012; 62:2383-2387
Facultatively heterofermentative (hexoses are fermented almost exclusively to lactic acid by the Embden - Meyerhof pathway or, at
least by some species, to lactic acid, acetic acid, ethanol, and formic acid under glucose limitations; pentoses are fermented
to lactic acid and acetic acid via an inducible phosphoketolase).

Positive results for esculin hydrolysis, casein hydrolysis, fermentation of: amygdalin, L-arabinose, arbutin, cellobiose, esculin,
fructose, galactose (weak), gentiobiose, gluconate, glucose (acid, without gas production), maltose, mannose, melezitose,
N-acetylglucosamine, salicin, sucrose, trehalose, and D-xylose.

Negative results for arginine hydrolysis, catalase, gelatin hydrolysis, indole, nitrate reduction, starch hydrolysis, oxidase, urea
hydrolysis, fermentation of: adonitol, D-arabinose, arabitol, dulcitol, erythritol, fucose, 2-ketogluconate, 5-ketogluconate, glycerol,  
glycogen, inositol, inulin, lactose, D-lyxose, mannitol, melibiose, raffinose, rhamnose, ribose, sorbitol, sorbose, starch, tagatose,
turanose, L-xylose, and xylitol.
(c) Costin Stoica
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