Helicobacter cetorum
  1. C. G. Harper, Y. Feng, S. Xu, N. S. Taylor, M. Kinsel, F. E. Dewhirst, B. J. Paster, M. Greenwell, G. Levine, A. Rogers, and J. G. Fox.
    Helicobacter cetorum sp. nov., a Urease-Positive Helicobacter Species Isolated from Dolphins and Whales. J. Clin. Microbiol.
    December 2002 40:12 4536-4543.
Taxonomy
Morphology
Cultural characteristics
Biochemical characters
Ecology
Pathogenicity
References
Phylum Proteobacteria, Class Epsilonproteobacteria, Order Campylobacterales, Family Helicobacteraceae, Genus Helicobacter,
Helicobacter cetorum Harper et al. 2006.
Gram-negative, fusiform rods, 4 x 0.6 μm. Motile by means of bipolar single flagella
laterally located at the end of the bacteria. Coccoid forms develop in old cultures. Non-
sporulating.
Cultured on Trypticase Soy Agar with 5% sheep blood. Grow as distinct colonies or a
thin, spreading film. Grows in microaerophilic conditions, at 37 and 42 ºC, not at 25
ºC. No aerobic or anaerobic growth. No growth on Brucella agar supplemented with
1% glycine.
Isolated from the main stomach of two wild, stranded Atlantic white-sided dolphins (Lagenorhynchus acutus) died on the beach and
from the feces of three captive cetaceans: two dolphins (
Tursiops truncatus & Lagenorhynchus obliquidens); and a beluga whale
(
Delphinapterus leucas).
Sensitive to cephalothin (30 μg) and intermediate to nalidixic acid (30 μg).
Captive cetaceans presented subclinical, or clinical signs included intermittent regurgitation, inappetance, weight loss, and lethargy.
Ulcers were observed in the esophagus and forestomach during endoscopic examination in two of the three captive animals.
Positive results for urease, catalase, oxidase and gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase.

Negative results for  indoxyl acetate hydrolysis, nitrate reduction and alkaline phosphatase.
(c) Costin Stoica
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