Moraxella canis
Taxonomy
Morphology
Cultural characteristics
Biochemical characters
Ecology
Pathogenicity
References
Phylum Proteobacteria, Class Gammaproteobacteria, Order Pseudomonadales, Family Moraxellaceae, Genus Moraxella, Moraxella
canis
Jannes et al. 1993.
Gram-negative cocci 0.8 to 1.3 μm, usually occuring in pairs or short chains.
Nonmotile.
Colony size and shape vary from small, greyish colonies to large, smooth colonies
that look more like the Enterobacteriaceae. Some strains produce very slimy colonies
resembling colonies of
Klebsiella pneumoniae. Other strains produce M.
catarrhalis
-like colonies (semiconvex colonies that can be shifted around (hockey
puck test) and can be picked from the agar without losing their shape.
A brown pigment may be observed on starch containing Mueller-Hinton agar (MH2).
Not haemolytic on human or sheep blood agar. Aerobic. Mesophilic. Cell growth is
usually observed on medium containing mineral salts and ammonium acetate,
lactose bromothymol blue agar, eosinemethylene blue agar, Mueller-Hinton agar, and
MacConkey agar at 37 ºC.
No growth occurs in the presence of 6% NaCl or at 5 ºC. Can grow in the presence of
bile salts.
Isolated from the saliva of dogs or cats and occasionally from humans (dog bite wounds, blood and infected lymph node).
It's an upper-respiratory tract commensal from dogs and cats and is considered nonpathogenic for humans. May be involved in
canine conjunctivitis.
  1. Geert Jannes, Mario Vaneechoutte, Martine Lannoo, Monique Gillis, Marc Vancanneyt, Peter Vandamme, Gerda Verschraegen,
    Hugo Van Heuverswyn, and Rudi Rossau. Polyphasic Taxonomy Leading to the Proposal of Moraxella canis sp. nov. for Moraxella
    catarrhalis-Like Strains. Int J Syst Bacteriol July 1993 43:438-449.
  2. Elliot Juni and Kjell Bovre: Order IX Pseudomonadales Orla-Jensen 1921, Family II Moraxellaceae Rossau, Van Landschoot,
    Gillis and De Ley 1991 In:  Bergey’s Manual of Systematic Bacteriology, Second edition,Vol two, part B, George M. Garrity (Editor-in-
    Chief), pp. 411-442.
  3. Mario Vaneechoutte, Geert Claeys, Sophia Steyaert, Thierry De Baere, Renaat Peleman, and Gerda Verschraegen. Isolation of
    Moraxella canis from an Ulcerated Metastatic Lymph Node. J Clin Microbiol. 2000 October; 38(10): 3870–3871.
  4. Gabriel Ionescu, Delia Berceanu-Vaduva: Cocobacili Gram negativi nefermentativi. In: (Eds.) Dumitru Buiuc, Marian Negut. Tratat
    de microbiologie clinica, ed. a III-a, cap. 32.2, 787-795.
  5. I. Vela, C. Sanchez-Porro, V. Aragon, A. Olvera, L. Domínguez, A. Ventosa, and J. F. Fernandez-Garayzabal. Moraxella porci sp.
    nov., isolated from pigs. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol October 2010 60:2446-2450.
Positive results for alkaline phosphatase, catalase, oxidase,  butyrase, esterase, DNase, gamma-glutamyl-aminopeptidase & nitrate
reduction.

Negative results for acid phosphatase (strains CCUG 26883 is positive), carbonic anhydrase, gelatin hydrolysis, indole, lipase,
lecithinase, phenylalanine deaminase, starch hydrolysis,Tween 80 hydrolysis, urease. No acid is produced from glucose, maltose,
saccharose & lactose.
(c) Costin Stoica
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