Taxonomy
Morphology
Cultural characteristics
Biochemical characters
Ecology
Pathogenicity
References
Phylum Actinobacteria, Class Actinobacteria, Subclass Actibacteridae, Order Actynomycetales, Suborder Corynebacterinae, Family
Corynebacteriaceae, Genus Corynebacterium,
Corynebacterium jeikeium Jackman, Pitcher, Pelczynska and Borman 1988.

Historical synonym: CDC group JK.
Gram-positive, pleomorphic, occasionally club-shaped rods, arranged in V forms or
palisades.
Good growth in BHI broth and on blood agar supplemented with 1% Tween 80.
Colonies are low convex, greyish-white, small, 0.5-1 mm in diameter after 24 h of
incubation at 37 ºC on sheep blood agar; colonies are large (2-4 mm) on SBA  
supplemented with 1% Tween 80. Addition of 1-2 drops of sterile rabbit serum to
broth as a standard lipid supplement is recommended. Strict aerobe,no anaerobic
growth. Growth temperature: 30-42 ºC; weak growth at 22 ºC. Hemolysis is not
produced. CAMP reaction is negative.
It is considered part of the normal flora of the skin; it can also be recovered from the inanimate hospital environment. Is one of the
most frequently encountered corynebacteria in clinical specimens.
Susceptible to vancomycin, glycopeptide antibiotics and pristanamycin. Resistant to penicillins,
aminoglycosides & cephalosporins.
Often multiresistant to antibiotics.
It were first characterized as diphtheroids associated with bacterial endocarditis following cardiac surgery. Animal infections did not
occur.
It was most frequently associated with immunocompromised hosts with malignancies, in-place medical devices, prolonged hospital
stays, breaks in integument, and therapy with broad-spectrum antibiotics
C. jeikeium infections were associated with: AIDS, neutropenia, neoplasms, meningitis with transverse myelitis, cerebral ventriculitis,
ventricular cerebrospinal fluid shunt infections, prosthetic and native heart valve endocarditis, osteomyelitis after total hip replacement,
infectious arthritis after arthroplasty, lymphadenopathy in a patient with Whipple’s disease.
  1. Funke G., von Graevenitz A., Clarridge III J.E., and Bernard K.A., 1997. Clinical Microbiology of Coryneform Bacteria. Clinical
    Microbiology Rewiews Vol. 10, No. 1, p. 125-159.
  2. Funke G., 2006.Corynebacteria and rare coryneforms. In: Topley & Wilson’s Microbiology & Microbial Infections, 10th Edition,
    Edited by Borriello S.P., Murray P.R. and Funke G.,Edward Arnold (Publishers) Ltd., Bacteriology, volume 2.
  3. Holt J.G., Krieg N.R., Sneath P.H.A., Staley J.T. and Williams S.T., 1994. Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, Ninth
    Edition, Williams & Wilkins, A Waverly Company, Baltimore, pp 571-596.
Oxidative metabolism.

Positive results for alkaline phosphatase, catalase, lipophilism, pyrazinamidase, acid production from: galactose & glucose.

Negative results for casein hydrolysis, esculin hydrolysis, methyl red, nitrate reduction, oxidase, tyrosine hydrolysis, urease, acid
production from: arabinose, dextrin, fructose, lactose, mannitol, mannose, raffinose, rhamnose, salicin, starch, sucrose, trehalose &
xylose.

Acid production from maltose is variable.

In the 'API Coryne' system,
C. jeikeium may fail to demonstrate sufficient acid formation from glucose or maltose, resulting in incorrect
identification.
Corynebacterium jeikeium
(c) Costin Stoica
Antibiogram
Encyclopedia
Culture media
Biochemical tests
Stainings
Images
Movies
Articles
Identification
Software
R E G N U M
PROKARYOTAE
Previous page
Back