Campylobacter fetus
Taxonomy
Morphology
Cultural characteristics
Biochemical characters
Ecology
Pathogenicity
References
Phylum Proteobacteria, Class Epsilonproteobacteria, Order Campylobacterales, Family Campylobacteraceae, Genus Campylobacter,
Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus (Smith and Taylor 1919) Veron and Chatelain 1973,
Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis (Florent 1959) Veron and Chatelain 1973.

Old synonyms:
Vibrio fetus Smith and Taylor 1919, Spirillum fetus Lehmann and Neumann 1927, Vibrio fetus subsp. venerealis Florent
1959.
Gram-negative, curved, S or seagull-shaped cells, 0.2-0.3 x 1.5-5 μm. Coccoid forms
may appear in old cultures. Very motile.
Colonies on blood agar are nonhemolytic, round, 1 mm in diameter, smooth, raised,
convex, and grayish white or light tan colored. Several  types of colonies may be
formed. Smooth colonies, are small, 0.5 mm in diameter, round, slightly raised,
colorless, and slightly translucent. “Cut-glass” colonies are 1 mm in diameter, round,
raised, translucent, and granular with reflecting facets. Rough colonies are rarely
found.
Grow
s on solid media containing 1.0-1.5% ox-bile and at 30 ºC, but not on media
containing 0.04% triphenyl-tetrazolium chloride. Most strains grow on media
containing 0.05% safranin and 64 mg/l cefoperazone. No growth in 2% NaCl media.
C. fetus subsp. fetus was isolated from the intestinal tracts and gallbladder of sheep, cattle, swine, birds, and humans.It has also
been isolated occasionally from the genital tract, the viscera, or the blood.
C. fetus subsp. venerealis  was isolated to the bovine genital tract (semen and vaginal secretion), placenta and tissues of aborted
bovine fetuses. It is unable to survive in the intestinal tract.
C. fetus subsp. fetus  is usually commensal of the intesinal tract of humans and animals. May cause sporadic abortion in cows and
sheep.
Experimentally pathogenic for guinea pigs, hamsters, embryonated chicken eggs but not from rabbits, mice, or rats.
C. fetus subsp. venerealis  causes enzootic venereal sterility in cows and abortion in pregnant cows.
  1. Don J. Brenner and J.J. Farmer III, 2001. Family I. Campylobacteraceae. In: Bergey’s Manual of Systematic Bacteriology, Second
    edition,Vol 2, part C, George M. Garrity (Editor-in-Chief), pp 1145-1168.
  2. M. Veron andR. Chatelain. Taxonomic Study of the Genus Campylobacter Sebald and Veron and Designation of the Neotype
    Strain for the Type Species, Campylobacter fetus (Smith and Taylor) Sebald and Veron Int J Syst Bacteriol April 1973 23:122-134.
Positive results for catalase, oxidase, nitrate reduction
Negative results for urea hydrolysis, hippurate hydrolysis, indoxyl acetate hydrolysis,
 H2S production onTSI.
(c) Costin Stoica
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R E G N U M
PROKARYOTAE
Legend: +  positive 90-100%, - negative 90-100%, [+] positive 75-89%, [-] negative 75-89%, d positive 25-74% of strains
 
Selenite reduction
Growth at 42 ºC
Growth with 1% glycine
Growth with KMnO4 .
C. fetus subsp. fetus
[+]
[+]
+
+
C. fetus subsp. venerealis
-
-
-
[-]
Differential characters of the subspecies:
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